Networking In Person vs Networking Online

By April 11, 2018 August 4th, 2019 Professional Networking
Common Ground Matching Tool connects professionals

Networking In Person vs Networking Online

Everyone now, who has an online social media account, has a social media presence. Networking has taken on a whole new meaning in the Internet age. Online networking tools include the networks themselves–basically, webs of millions of people who are just a few clicks away from receiving an electronic message from anyone within the network–and the nifty little software applications that help to maintain and update those networks.
Overtime people came up with various ways to communicate and to keep communicating, from prehistoric caveman paintings, to the early years of pigeons, telegraphs, telephones, to the 20th century of today, the world wide web. For people back then, in order to communicate, or get your message across to someone, or place, you had to physically deliver it. Shouting worked well for next-door neighbors, but at any greater distance, another solution was necessary. Believe it, people actually went to the library and consulted actual books to get the answers to a question. There was no Google to give them the meaning of life. Later on, the efforts of communication were beginning to speed up. During the 1800s, land lines were established, and morse code was being used, which sequenced dots and dashes to spell out messages. It wasn’t until a decade later where communication took a big turn. Through the development of technology voice waves were being sent over airwaves.
From communicating through contacts in person, meet and greets, conferences to online networking. The process is beginning to change. The option of being anywhere with a smartphone now a days, you have the ability to get your message across in no time at all, then receive a response within seconds if that other party is online. Let’s look at the benefits of this. Although networking is great online because it really opens the horizon to multiple platforms and their contacts and so forth. Although it may take away from the interaction people may receive on first name basis. Networking in person has the physical connection to speak to one another and get a feel for how someone’s work ethic is, their confidence, their interactions, maybe even their gestures and how they may handle some of the questions you or everyone may ponder.
Personal networks are intended to be mutually beneficial, extending the concept of teamwork beyond the immediate peer group. The term is usually encountered in the workplace, though it could apply equally to other pursuits outside work.

Online networking is evolving now with video connections that help ease this pain. Instead of just email connections, video conferences are becoming more and more prominent to get points across or to have the emotion or demands felt. Another tip, is to make your presence known. Have a distinct way of speaking to one another, use that vocabulary to describe something to the best of your ability. You have to make sure people know what you are doing and what you have in the works — otherwise nobody will ever know. Keep in touch with your professional contacts via email, social media and face-to-face meetings. When you maintain contact you remain on their radar, which can result in them name-dropping you to their contacts. A simple, “Oh, I actually know somebody you should contact” can occur simply because you kept your presence noticeable. Find a Reason to Pursue, don’t let these new contacts go untouched. Continue to pursue something they said, such as a follow up on how those certain things are going, communicate and communicate well. They may have something for you or just information they are not sharing. In researching, people cling to those with same ambitious goals. They can relate to the hard work ethic and are willing to share the wealth so to speak. It may not be something you wanted but within those areas there’s more doors for growth. Always look for a silver lining.